Chillwave Wednesday LXIII

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Chillwave Wednesday: a semi-weekly shortlist of chill music around the internet.


Miller Matthews: “The Wild”

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There’s a feeling that I get a lot which involves me being both extremely relaxed and extremely energized at the exact same time. If you have no idea what I’m talking about you will after listening to “The Wild” by Miller Matthews. With this release, the 19 year old Canadian takes us on a journey that could be experienced while sipping a cup of Coffee on a sunday morning or disturbing the peace on a friday night. Enjoy.

Follow |  https://www.facebook.com/MillerMatthewsOfficial


Montevideo Mondays (XXVI)

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I just have read a couple of hours ago this really cool interview with the great AdRock about his role as a middle age man in the new Baumbach’s movie, and also about his middle age man role in his actual, real life. I couldn’t become less identified with him when he spoke about not being particularly inclined to dance music and hits in his actual life. The “dance” part had an effect on me, because recently, I’ve been wondering when was the last time when I danced all night long in a party. Not that I am a dancer with moves or something, but I usually tend to think that I’m just getting to that phase of my life where you lose the few abilities that you’ve had as a “social dancer” and start dancing… like your parents. Is it possible that this could happen? The thing is, I stopped listening to “dance music” since a couple of months and wondering that maybe, with my adulthood I’ll say goodbye to my limited dancing abilities.

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That I may regain those abilities is still a question without answer. However, in these days I can’t stop listening to one hidden record in the myriad of uruguayan new music from this 2015. Guilty of that is Estaban Stopelli, who works as the funky devil behind the new sound of our hip hop local heroes La Teja Pride. In 2013, when I produced a series of shows played and filmed inside the newsroom where I work, LTP came to play but the highlight was the funky guitar sound of Stopelli and the variety of combinations of his guitar and talkbox and the electronic approach of the band. Esteban, who has never put an LP in his career, has put a couple of weeks ago this package of great, 100% original funky record that traces a clear contemporary influence located the Daft-Punk organic era of Random access memories. But please don’t get me wrong: that’s just the beginning. At the end, the music also seems to channel (whether in purpose or not) the reborn of argentinian funk gods Illya Kuriaki and The Valderramas but even without wasted time in climatic, irrelevant bites. This music goes to the bone, and despite the different ways he takes to mixture his funk vibe, that feeling that I’m hearing something thick never abandons me. These two ingredients mentioned in this sort of funk-cake are just sources that Stopelli adapt to his purposes (dance, get in climate, pay attention to the mix and the different sounds) in a record where you also may find some blaxploitation reminiscence, whole bunches of synthesizers, Stevie Wonder tributes and even think about acts like Blackstreet. Because this record is filled with lots, lots of flow, courtesy of local MCs that help those who listen remind where he comes from.

You may ask: where is Stopelli in the record? You may find him behind the good voices, with his sometimes sparkling, sometimes sublte guitar making solos or catalyzing the action with some powerful riffs. Very often is possible to see him surfing waves of sitars and other cliché surroundings that despite that doesn’t sound boring or predictable at all. His best moments, by the way, are the ones when everything looks effortless and unpretentious, such as when he adds local touches like in Niña, a great fusion that seems to bring some local candombe pieces into the spicy mix that inevitably channels local legend Rubén Rada’s work. It’s impossible to confirm it without asking, but it’s evident that our very own and legendary OPA is in the soul of this guitar player. After all, Stopelli is uruguayan and having a local recognisable influence its pretty inevitable around here but also a distinctive and cool way to add something closer to the scenery where these songs were crafted.

One of the best things about Suelto en el barrio Yagurú (“Alone in the Yagurú neighbourhood”) is that, as John Cage should say, is a record that has nothing to prove and proves it. If any, its purposes may be to make people move or at least feel confortable with the electrified good vibes of the music that comes out, even with an autotune well used. Here we have an easy going record packed with lots of technique, freewheelingness and also a great execution of a style exercise.

This can work as a great feel-good record with great playing and maybe also as a reminder for guys like me, a recent parent, that you can always find some brand new good music to dance while trying to make your son feel at ease in his new home. And by the way, it’s nice to be back at TNLF, again.

You can listen the whole thing here.

 

Montevideo Mondays is a column focused in the new music that comes from the local emergent scene in Montevideo. For now, it doesn’t have plans to open to other cities, and it’s mainly based in first listens of a couple of days that may later become critics, if the working/parenthood routine of the journalist who writes it allows him to do so. Big shout-out to James for the slick new graph that illustrates this space.


Hold Me Closer

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After losing myself in the wonderful vortex that is online music, LANKS appeared. His latest single has got me sitting here with a serious case of writer’s block. Touché, LANKS, touché.  Prepare to be swept into the undercurrent of a dark and comforting soundscape. And if you’re lucky enough to live in Australia, check him out while he does a mini tour this month.

 


SXSW 2015 – Festival Preview

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The monster festival event that is SXSW is now in full swing. With the film and interactive portions of SXSW coming to an end it’s time to get geared up for the grand finale… one of the biggest most terrifyingly vast music events in the world: SXSW music week.

And it is terrifying. Terrifying in a good and bad kind of way. On one hand, there is just so much music going on at once that you couldn’t possibly see all the acts you want to see. Do you see the popular band that you know and love… do you duck in and listen to an up-and-coming band that is getting a lot of buzz at the moment… or do you take a chance on a completely unknown band that is about to go on stage RIGHT NOW?! Good problems to have I suppose.

And while a fair bit of planning helps, SXSW is all about spontaneous discovery. The best way to experience it is to come with a plan and then let the tide take you where it will. With that in mind, I’ve devised (another) handy little guide for SXSW 2015.

This year I’ve made three lists:
1. The Bands you MUST see
2. The Bands you might not have heard of before but you MUST see
3. The Parties you should be going to

See the lists and listen to the bands here


OMYO – Come Back : TNLF Exclusive

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OMYO (‘Our Music, Your Opinion’) is a collaboration between two promising young songwriters from Oxfordshire – Tom McCorkell and William Edward. The pair came together after a chance meeting on New Year’s Eve, when a drunken promise to write a song together turned out far more successful than either could have expected, and within a week, they had two tracks under their belt, with Tom on vocals and William on production.

Both come from musical families, and interestingly Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees was Williams’ Godfather. They lived together for the first 20 years of his life, and William was exposed to musical genius first hand as a few number ones were written at his home and in the studio. Tom’s family also includes musicians working across the genre spectrum, from soul to heavy rock.

Come Back is their debut stereo single, and has a catchy summer-pop vibe to it. It’s also a TNLF exclusive, so have a listen and a share below.

 

 


Amarachi: “Mother” Demo

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“Mother” (Demo)

 

 


Terry Urban – Notorious B.I.G x FKA Twigs

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On the recent anniversary of the death of Christopher Wallace, aka Biggie Smalls, New York based DJ, producer and remix specialist Terry Urban has taken his famous acapellas and worked magic on them, layering them onto backing tracks provided by London’s very own FKA Twigs.

Formally knows as Twigs, FKA Twigs began her career as a dancer, the click her bones made when in motion prompting her stage name. Her debut album, LP1, was nominated for the Mercury music prize, she toured the world, hooked up with Robert Pattinson, and Dazed Magazine voted her “the musician who will redefine the future of style and youth culture as we know it” in 2015.

The result is a tasteful fresh perspective on hip hop classics. We’ve been jamming to this non-stop for the last 2 days here at TNLF. You should too.